Category Archives: Photography

Latest Sony announcements – 12 September 2012

In this video, Matt Granger introduces the Sony RX1, the SLT99, and a 300mm f/2.8 lens, plus some pro grade video gear.

Fuji Finepix F770 EXR

In this video, Matt Granger reviews the Fuji Finepix F770 EXR camera. Fuji has a long history of making great cameras, and this one seems to follow that tradition with innovative features such as GPS and RAW capabilities in a very small camera.

Canon 1Dx hands on (vs Nikon D4)

In this video, Matt Granger presents the Canon 1Dx and compares it to the Nikon D4.

Canon Lens Nomenclature – what the letters mean on Canon lenses

In this video, I discuss what the different letters and abbreviations mean on Canon lenses.

In my next video I will be discussing the different Canon mounts for the Canon DSLR and DSLM (mirrorless) cameras that you are likely to encounter on the market today to help you identify which mount your camera is compatible with, or to help you shop for any camera / lens combinations.  I will make videos for other lens manufacturers in the future.

I made the following table you can use to learn what the different letters represent.  I also added examples so you can practice.

Table of common Canon Lens Abbreviations

Table of common Canon Lens Abbreviations

Description from YouTube

If you ever wondered what all those letters mean: EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM, this is the right video for you.  In this video, I describe the Canon Lens Nomenclature and what all those letters and abbreviations mean.

You can find a copy of the table used in this video at our website:

http://www.studiojpic.com

Thank you for watching!  If you have any questions or comments, don’t be shy.

onOne DSLR Camera Remote Pro Introduction

Description from YouTube:

In this video I introduce the onOne DSLR Camera Remote Pro software for the iPhone. Since I don’t have an iPad yet, I can’t review the iPad version, but its basically the same thing with a nicer larger screen.

The DSLR Camera Remote Pro app turns your iPhone or iPad into a remote monitoring and remote control system for your Canon or Nikon DSLR camera. Hook up your camera to a computer or laptop, run the onOne Software DSLR Camera Remote Server, and control your camera wirelessly with your iPhone or iPad.

Check out this amazing tool at www.ononesoftware.com

Don’t forget to visit our blog at www.studiojpic.com

If you would like to test it out before you purchase it, they also offer a free (crippled) version.

Thank you for watching this video. To see more of my videos, please hit the subscribe button on top. See you next time!

This video was filmed with the Canon EOS T2i and an EF 50mm f/1.8 lens.
The audio was captured using the Neewer lapel microphone and the Zoom H4n.
Focusing done with the onOne DSLR Camera Remote Pro for iPhone.
Lighting done by bouncing off a work lamp on the wall, though sadly you can see some reflection in my glasses.

Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD – AF/VC noise and AF speed test

In this video, I do a quick demonstration of the noises you can expect from the AF and VC motors of the Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC US lens.  I also show how fast the AF motor is.

Description from YouTube:

User incognitostatus made a request that I do a video to show the noise you can expect to hear from this Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD lens.

I find the noise of the AF motor to be very quiet, and the VC motor to be a little bit noisier when it goes on or off, but overall I wouldn’t say it’s a noisy lens, and it definitely makes less noise than the shutter sound no my T2i.

While I had everything set up, I decided to also do a little demonstration to show how quickly the AF system is. I only very briefly had the chance to try out some L lenses, but I am very satisfied by the AF performance of this lens. It is accurate most of the time, quick, and quiet.

This was filmed using the iPhone 4S and stabilized with YouTube’s Image Stabilizer function (which is playing tricks with the logo and the distortion of the video a bit).

The Audio was recorded on the H4n using the Neewer Lapel mic I reviewed earlier to capture the noises of the lens, and the SM58 to capture my voice.

 

What’s in my Camera Bag

In this 3 parts series, I do a review of the LowePro Pro Runner AW450 camera bag and show you my photography and videography equipment, and share my experience with all of them.  In the first part, I do a review of the bag itself, then in the second video I show my audio equipment equip, and in the third video I show my photography equipment.

Description from YouTube:

In Part 1 of this series, I do a review and demonstration of the LowePro Pro Runner AW450 camera bag.

In parts 2 and 3, I will show what’s in my camera bag and explain why I use each piece of gear and how the experience has been so far. Part 2 will focus on my audio kit, and Part 3 will focus on my photography kit. The AW 450 has plenty of room for both.

This was filmed with my iPhone 4S for both video and audio.

If you liked this video, click the thumbs up icon. If you’d like to see more reviews like these, hit the subscribe button. If there’s anything in particular you’d like me to do a video about, leave a comment bellow.

Thanks for watching!

Description from YouTube:

In Part 2 of this series, I show you the audio gear I store away in my camera bag. I explain what I use each piece of equipment for, and show you a few tips along the way.

This features the Zoom H4n, the Shure SM58 microphone, a 1/4″ 20-thread hotshoe adapter, an XLR cable and the Apex HP35 headphones.

In Part 1 of this series, I did a review of the camera bag itself.

In Part 3 of this series, I will show the photography gear I bring along in my bag.

This was filmed with my iPhone 4S for both video and audio.

If you liked this video, click the thumbs up icon. If you’d like to see more reviews like these, hit the subscribe button. If there’s anything in particular you’d like me to do a video about, leave a comment bellow.

Thanks for watching!

Description from YouTube:

In Part 3 of this series, I show you the photography gear I store away in my camera bag. I explain what I use each piece of equipment for, and show you a few tips along the way.

This features the Canon Rebel T2i, the Tamron SP 70-300 DI VC USD, the Canon EF-S 18-55 mm IS kit lens, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8, and the Canon EF 75-300mm F/4-5.6 III. I also show some Tiefen filters, a plump bob with some fishing line, some memory cards, and a few other gadgets.

In Part 1 of this series, I did a review of the camera bag itself.

In Part 2 of this series, I did a quick review of my audio gear, and showed how everything fits together.

This was filmed with my iPhone 4S for both video and audio.

If you liked this video, click the thumbs up icon. If you’d like to see more reviews like these, hit the subscribe button. If there’s anything in particular you’d like me to do a video about, leave a comment bellow.

Thanks for watching!

Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD

The Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD quickly became my favourite lens.  This 3-part series shows the unpacking of the lens, an introduction to the lens, and a test of the Vibration Compensation (VC) system.

Description from YouTube:

This is the unboxing of the Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD lens. I discuss my first impressions of its build quality and show what comes in the box.

Video captured with an iPhone 4s, audio captured with a Zoom H4n and SM58 mic.

Description from YouTube:

This is an introduction to the Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD lens.  I discuss the features of the lens, and show some pictures at the end with 100% crops.

I already posted a video of a Vibration Control test of this lens, and will post other videos in the future.

If there’s anything in particular you would like to know about this lens, leave a comment bellow, and I’ll try to reply or make a new video out of it.

This was filmed on a T2i with a 50mm f/1.8 lens.  The audio comes from a Zoom H4n with a SM58 microphone.

Sorry for the audio, my memory card was dying on me, and the file sort of got corrupted in a few places.  In one case I had to use the built-in mic of the T2i for a few seconds.

Description from YouTube:

In this test, I show clips at 1080p at 70mm and 300mm with and without VC.

I then use the Canon T2i’s 480p crop mode for an added 7x, giving 70 x 7 x 1.6 = 784mm and 300 x 7 x 1.6 = 3360mm, showing again the difference between VC on and off.

So far I’m very impressed with this lens in general, and the VC is quite remarkable. See for yourself, and leave your comments and questions bellow.

I will be doing more videos reviewing different aspects of this Tamron lens, so subscribe if you want to see the next videos!

1.76$ DIY iPhone 4S tripod adapter

This is my first Do-it-yourself video.  Posted on December 4th, 2011, this video shows how to build your own adapter to attach your iPhone 4S to a tripod.  Since this video, I added the Velcro directly to a cheap camera case I bought just for this purpose, and it makes the rig much more solid.

Description from YouTube:

Very simple Do-it-yourself iPhone 4S tripod adapter.  In this example I use a mini tripod, or table tripod, but you can use any tripod with a standard 1/4″ 20 thread screw.

Alternatively, you could put the Velcro fasteners on a case if you’re iffy about gluing anything to your iPhone.  You can also put the Velcros anywhere else you might want to attach your iPhone.

Materials:

Bracket: Brace, CRNR Zinc HD 2×5/8″ – 0.99$
Wing Nut 1/4″ 20-thread: 0.39$
Fasteners, Quare White 7/8″, 12 per pack – 4.59$ total or – 0.38$ each

Total: 5.97$ if you include everything, or 1.76$ if you take the unit cost of the Velcro fasteners.

Prices are in Canadian dollars from a local Home Depot.  I’m sure in larger cities you could find better deals if you look around.

Video filmed with a Canon T2i with 50mm f/1.8 lens at f/2.8, 1/60, 400-ISO.
Sound captured with Zoom H4n using built-in mics.

Canon S90 vs iPhone 4S vs Canon T2i Video Test

This video, updated on YouTube on October 16, 2011, serves as a comparison between the Canon S90 point & shoot camera, the iPhone 4S smart phone, and the Canon T2i DSLR camera.  It is rather impressive how well the iPhone 4S does compared to the Canon T2i.  With proper color correction and proper lighting, you can definitely take great videos from this smart phone.  You can also see how far along the iPhone has come when you compare it to the Canon S90 point & shoot, which was Canon’s most advanced point & shoot at the time.

Description from YouTube:

This is a comparison of the Canon S90, the iPhone 4S, and the Canon T2i. Note that the S90 captures in 480p, which explains why it’s pretty nice at 480p, but fails at full screen 1080p.