Category Archives: Tutorials

Tutorials for both Software and Hardware

Install LUT buddy for Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects CS6

In this video, I show how to install the Red Giant Software Magic Bullet LUT Buddy effect for Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects CS6.  The installer only gives you options for CS3, CS4, CS5, and CS5.5, but by moving folders around, you can get it working with CS6 in a few seconds.

This shows the folder structure using Windows 7 defaults.  For Mac users, you can do a similar thing by going to the default folder where your Adobe files are installed.

Zoom H4n Introduction – How to use your Zoom H4n as a USB audio interface

Description from YouTube:

In this video I show how to use a Zoom H4n as a USB audio interface, allowing you to record what the Zoom hears on your computer.  This is great for voice-over videos where you show viewers how to use a software, or any other occasion where you want your voice to be recorded by the computer.

This was filmed using my Canon T2i and a 50mm f/1.8 lens.  Sound was recorded by the Neewer lapel mic plugged into the camera directly.

Visit our blog at http://www.studiojpic.com

Quick Tip: Remove background noise in Adobe Audition from Adobe Premiere Pro CS6

Description from YouTube:

In this video, I show how to remove background noise in Adobe Audition by starting the process in Adobe Premiere Pro CS6.  After a few times, you can go through this in 2-3 minutes, and it will improve the audio quality of your videos tremendously.

Visit our blog: http://www.studiojpic.com

Quick Tip – Synchronize audio and video files in Adobe Premiere Pro

Description from YouTube:

In this video, I show how to synchronize your audio and video files, which is essential if you are using an external recorder such as the Zoom H4n.

Once you are used to it, it will take you 5 to 10 seconds, and you will be all set.

I use Adobe Premiere Pro, but you should be able to do the same in most video editors.

Visit our blog at http://www.studiojpic.com

Please click the subscirbe button and the like button if you enjoyed this video.

Have a great day!

Zoom H4n Introduction – How to plug in an XLR or 1/4″ mic

Description from YouTube:

In this video, I show you how to plug in a mic which uses an XLR or 1/4″ cable such as the Shure SM58.  I also show you how to adjust the volumes to try to avoid audio clipping but also background noises.  And finally I show you how to record from more than one microhpone at a time, and how to adjust the volumes of each microphone.

I already posted videos to show how to use the built-in microphones of the Zoom H4n, and also how to use a microphone with a 3.5mm cable.

I will also upload a video on how to synchronize video and audio, and another one on how to remove the background noise from your audio files.

Thank you for watching, I hope you found it useful.  Please click the subscribe button and the like button if you enjoyed this video.

Visit our blog: http://www.studiojpic.com

This video was filmed with the Canon Rebel T2i camera and the Canon 50mm f/1.8 lens.  Since I needed both the Zoom and the Neewer lapel mic for demonstrations in this video, the audio is sadly recorded by the onboard microhpone of the T2i.

Have a great day!

Zoom H4n Introduction – How to plug in a 3.5mm mic such as a Neewer Lavalier Mic

Description from YouTube:

In this video, I show you how to plug in a 3.5mm mic such as the Neewer Lavalier microphone.  I also show you how to adjust the volumes to try to avoid audio clipping but also background noises.

I already posted a video to show how to use the built-in microphones of the Zoom H4n, and in the next video I will show how to connect a microphone that uses an XLR or a 1/4″ mic cable.

I will also upload a video on how to synchronize video and audio, and another one on how to remove the background noise from your audio files.

Thank you for watching, I hope you found it useful.  Please click the subscribe button and the like button if you enjoyed this video.

Visit our blog: http://www.studiojpic.com

This video was filmed with the Canon Rebel T2i camera and the Canon 50mm f/1.8 lens.  Since I needed both the Zoom and the Neewer lapel mic for demonstrations in this video, the audio is sadly recorded by the onboard microhpone of the T2i.

Have a great day!

Zoom H4n Quick Start Guide

Welcome to my Quick Start Guide for the Zoom H4n.  If you have any questions about this, please leave a comment and I will do my best to help you out.

Description from YouTube:

In this video, I show you how to get started with a Zoom H4n, from changing the batteries and memory card all the way to your first recording with the built-in microphones.

In the next video, I will show you how to connect a 3.5mm microphone such as the Neewer lapel microphone I reviewed on this channel.  After that I will do a video on how to connect an XLR or 1/4″ microphone such as the Shure SM 58, and how to record up to 4 tracks at once.

Finally, I will also add a video to show how you can synchronize your audio and video files in Adobe Premiere Pro, and will probably add another one on how to clean up some of the noise from your files in Adobe Audition.

Thank you for watching.  If you liked this video, please click the Like and Subscribe buttons.

This was filmed with my Canon T2i and 50mm f/1.8 lens.  The audio was recorded with my Neewer lapel microphone plugged into the camera directly since I needed to use my Zoom H4n for this demonstration.

Visit our blog at http://www.studiojpic.com

Have a great day!

Canon DSLR Cameras Introduction and mounts

This video is a follow-up of my Canon Lens nomenclature.  This time I show you which Canon DSLR and DSLM (mirrorless) cameras come with which mount.  I also introduce my classification system and explain who would benefit more from each level of Canon cameras.

Description from YouTube:

In this video, I introduce the various Canon DSLR cameras along with their mounts.  This video will help you find which lenses are compatible with which cameras by understanding the mount of each Canon DSLR camera.  I also introduce each model by explaining where they sit in the food chain, and who is likely to be interested in each type of camera.

Here is the table shown in this video:

Table showing the mount types of Canon DSLR and DSLM cameras

Table 2 – Canon Camera Mounts

Canon announces their first mirrorless camera

In a press release today, Canon announced a new camera, the Canon EOS M, which will be their first mirrorless camera.  Using the APS-C CMOS sensor like you can find on the Canon EOS T4i/650D camera, this new Canon EOS M will feature a great sensor in a much smaller body.

Canon will also be selling an EF-EOS M mount adapter which will let you attach your favourite EF and EF-S lenses on the new Canon EOS M camera.

They also announced two new lenses, a EF-M 22mm f/2 STM kit lens and the optional EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM.

The Canon EOS T4i / 650D introduced the STM lenses, that feature a new AF motor which allows for smoother and more accurate auto-focusing while using the LCD to take your pictures.  The new STM lenses will be even more important for the Canon EOS M since it does not contain a mirror, which means you will be relying exclusively on the LCD screen to frame your pictures.

So what are my thoughts?

I believe that mirrorless cameras, or Digital Single Lens Mirrorless (dSLM) cameras as some are starting to call them, are the future, and I’m very excited to see Canon go down that road.  I think it is great that Canon will use a great sensor and that it will be an ASP-C sized sensor.

The problem with competing dSLM systems is that most have smaller sensors.  Smaller sensors offer greater magnification at the cost of image quality and very noisy ISO performance.  By using their newest 18 megapixel ASP-C sensor which is already included in the T4i/650d, Canon is finally offering an option where you do not need to compromise on image quality in order to get a portable camera.

The new M-Mount is great and will allow for some good quality lenses to be manufactured at a cheaper price point.  Since the EOS M does not have a bulky mirror, Canon was able to place the back of the lenses closer to the sensor, allowing for smaller lenses to be built, while retraining great image quality.  And with the EF-EOS M adapter, you can still use all the EF and EF-S lenses you have, and preserve the auto-focusing abilities of those lenses.

The downside of the EOS M camera is the lack of manual controls.  While making the camera easier to use towards the general population who are not photographers and have no intention of becoming one, the EOS M will be harder to use for the more professional users, which is a shame since it will come in a smaller size and offer great quality at an affordable price, which could have piqued some photographers’ interest.  If not as a primary camera, the EOS M could’ve been a great second camera for their leisure time, but with the manual controls not present on the body itself, the pros will have to skip at least this first generation.

 

 

To read the press release yourself, follow the following link:

http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/about_canon?pageKeyCode=pressreldetail&docId=0901e024805d7bdb

More information on the Canon EOS M can be found on the Canon webpage:

http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/slr_cameras/eos_m_ef_m_22mm_stm_kit