onOne DSLR Camera Remote Pro Introduction

Description from YouTube:

In this video I introduce the onOne DSLR Camera Remote Pro software for the iPhone. Since I don’t have an iPad yet, I can’t review the iPad version, but its basically the same thing with a nicer larger screen.

The DSLR Camera Remote Pro app turns your iPhone or iPad into a remote monitoring and remote control system for your Canon or Nikon DSLR camera. Hook up your camera to a computer or laptop, run the onOne Software DSLR Camera Remote Server, and control your camera wirelessly with your iPhone or iPad.

Check out this amazing tool at www.ononesoftware.com

Don’t forget to visit our blog at www.studiojpic.com

If you would like to test it out before you purchase it, they also offer a free (crippled) version.

Thank you for watching this video. To see more of my videos, please hit the subscribe button on top. See you next time!

This video was filmed with the Canon EOS T2i and an EF 50mm f/1.8 lens.
The audio was captured using the Neewer lapel microphone and the Zoom H4n.
Focusing done with the onOne DSLR Camera Remote Pro for iPhone.
Lighting done by bouncing off a work lamp on the wall, though sadly you can see some reflection in my glasses.

Canon announces their first mirrorless camera

In a press release today, Canon announced a new camera, the Canon EOS M, which will be their first mirrorless camera.  Using the APS-C CMOS sensor like you can find on the Canon EOS T4i/650D camera, this new Canon EOS M will feature a great sensor in a much smaller body.

Canon will also be selling an EF-EOS M mount adapter which will let you attach your favourite EF and EF-S lenses on the new Canon EOS M camera.

They also announced two new lenses, a EF-M 22mm f/2 STM kit lens and the optional EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM.

The Canon EOS T4i / 650D introduced the STM lenses, that feature a new AF motor which allows for smoother and more accurate auto-focusing while using the LCD to take your pictures.  The new STM lenses will be even more important for the Canon EOS M since it does not contain a mirror, which means you will be relying exclusively on the LCD screen to frame your pictures.

So what are my thoughts?

I believe that mirrorless cameras, or Digital Single Lens Mirrorless (dSLM) cameras as some are starting to call them, are the future, and I’m very excited to see Canon go down that road.  I think it is great that Canon will use a great sensor and that it will be an ASP-C sized sensor.

The problem with competing dSLM systems is that most have smaller sensors.  Smaller sensors offer greater magnification at the cost of image quality and very noisy ISO performance.  By using their newest 18 megapixel ASP-C sensor which is already included in the T4i/650d, Canon is finally offering an option where you do not need to compromise on image quality in order to get a portable camera.

The new M-Mount is great and will allow for some good quality lenses to be manufactured at a cheaper price point.  Since the EOS M does not have a bulky mirror, Canon was able to place the back of the lenses closer to the sensor, allowing for smaller lenses to be built, while retraining great image quality.  And with the EF-EOS M adapter, you can still use all the EF and EF-S lenses you have, and preserve the auto-focusing abilities of those lenses.

The downside of the EOS M camera is the lack of manual controls.  While making the camera easier to use towards the general population who are not photographers and have no intention of becoming one, the EOS M will be harder to use for the more professional users, which is a shame since it will come in a smaller size and offer great quality at an affordable price, which could have piqued some photographers’ interest.  If not as a primary camera, the EOS M could’ve been a great second camera for their leisure time, but with the manual controls not present on the body itself, the pros will have to skip at least this first generation.

 

 

To read the press release yourself, follow the following link:

http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/about_canon?pageKeyCode=pressreldetail&docId=0901e024805d7bdb

More information on the Canon EOS M can be found on the Canon webpage:

http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/slr_cameras/eos_m_ef_m_22mm_stm_kit

Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD – AF/VC noise and AF speed test

In this video, I do a quick demonstration of the noises you can expect from the AF and VC motors of the Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC US lens.  I also show how fast the AF motor is.

Description from YouTube:

User incognitostatus made a request that I do a video to show the noise you can expect to hear from this Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD lens.

I find the noise of the AF motor to be very quiet, and the VC motor to be a little bit noisier when it goes on or off, but overall I wouldn’t say it’s a noisy lens, and it definitely makes less noise than the shutter sound no my T2i.

While I had everything set up, I decided to also do a little demonstration to show how quickly the AF system is. I only very briefly had the chance to try out some L lenses, but I am very satisfied by the AF performance of this lens. It is accurate most of the time, quick, and quiet.

This was filmed using the iPhone 4S and stabilized with YouTube’s Image Stabilizer function (which is playing tricks with the logo and the distortion of the video a bit).

The Audio was recorded on the H4n using the Neewer Lapel mic I reviewed earlier to capture the noises of the lens, and the SM58 to capture my voice.

 

Hartland Bridge celebrating 111 year anniversary

I posted this video a while back, but since the Hartland Bridge is celebrating its 111th anniversary, I decided to post here also.

Enjoy a drive on the world’s longest covered bridge!

Fourway microphone comparison Neewer lapel Zoom H4n Shure SM58 Canon T2i

In this video series, I will be posting some comparisons between the Neewer lapel microphone, the Zoom H4n, the Shure SM58, and the built-in microphone of the Canon EOS Rebel T2i.

The first video is shot indoors in a low noise environment.  The second video is shot outdoors with very little wind, and the 3rd video will be shot on a very windy day.

Description from YouTube:

In this video, I do a comparison between the Neewer lapel microphone, the built-in microphones of the Zoom H4n, the Shure SM 58, and the built-in microphones of the Canon Rebel T2i.

This video shows how each microphone sounds in a quiet environment with very little noise.

Filmed using the Canon T2i and a 50mm f/1.8 lens. The main narrative comes from the Neweer lapel microphone, then each section comes from its respective microphone.

I will also be doing an outdoors with low wind version of this video, and an outdoors with high wind version.

In this video, I do a comparison between the Neewer lapel microphone, the built-in microphones of the Zoom H4n, the Shure SM 58, and the built-in microphones of the Canon Rebel T2i.

This video shows how each microphone sounds in an outside environment with very little wind.

Filmed using the Canon T2i and a 50mm f/1.8 lens. The main narrative comes from the Neweer lapel microphone, then each section comes from its respective microphone.

I will also be doing an outdoors with high wind version.

Moon travelling at 1000% speed

The moon may appear quite stationary to the naked eye, but point a camera at it with a 300mm lens long enough, and you’ll notice the movement.  To make it more apparent, I sped it up to 10 times its normal speed, so 1000% speed.

Description from YouTube:

This is a quick video I shot of the moon on my Canon T2i with the Tamron SP 70-300 VC USD lens @ 300mm.

I then sped up the video at 1000%, as I felt a 21 minute was too slow.

The audio is me playing the Yamaha Clavinova CLP-370 PE, recorded on the Zoom H4n using the built-in speakers.

Neewer Lavalier Microphone

I bought this Neewer lapel microphone off ebay at 2.88$ including shipping and taxes in Canada, and I was quite amazed by the sound quality it produces.  I highly recommend you watch my review and see, or rather hear, for yourself.

If you are interested in buying one, you can support us by using the following link to the eBay auction: Neewer lapel microphone (eBay link)

Description from YouTube:

In this video, I do a review of the Neewer Lavalier Microphone I bought from ebay at 2.88$ CDN including shipping and taxes.

My first thoughts revolved about if this deal was too good to be true, but after reading and watching some reviews, I decided to take the gamble, and try out this super cheap lapel microphone.

I’m very amazed by the results so far, except for a few caviats I discuss in this video. But if you control the environment you record in, you can achieve great cheap results.

What’s in my Camera Bag

In this 3 parts series, I do a review of the LowePro Pro Runner AW450 camera bag and show you my photography and videography equipment, and share my experience with all of them.  In the first part, I do a review of the bag itself, then in the second video I show my audio equipment equip, and in the third video I show my photography equipment.

Description from YouTube:

In Part 1 of this series, I do a review and demonstration of the LowePro Pro Runner AW450 camera bag.

In parts 2 and 3, I will show what’s in my camera bag and explain why I use each piece of gear and how the experience has been so far. Part 2 will focus on my audio kit, and Part 3 will focus on my photography kit. The AW 450 has plenty of room for both.

This was filmed with my iPhone 4S for both video and audio.

If you liked this video, click the thumbs up icon. If you’d like to see more reviews like these, hit the subscribe button. If there’s anything in particular you’d like me to do a video about, leave a comment bellow.

Thanks for watching!

Description from YouTube:

In Part 2 of this series, I show you the audio gear I store away in my camera bag. I explain what I use each piece of equipment for, and show you a few tips along the way.

This features the Zoom H4n, the Shure SM58 microphone, a 1/4″ 20-thread hotshoe adapter, an XLR cable and the Apex HP35 headphones.

In Part 1 of this series, I did a review of the camera bag itself.

In Part 3 of this series, I will show the photography gear I bring along in my bag.

This was filmed with my iPhone 4S for both video and audio.

If you liked this video, click the thumbs up icon. If you’d like to see more reviews like these, hit the subscribe button. If there’s anything in particular you’d like me to do a video about, leave a comment bellow.

Thanks for watching!

Description from YouTube:

In Part 3 of this series, I show you the photography gear I store away in my camera bag. I explain what I use each piece of equipment for, and show you a few tips along the way.

This features the Canon Rebel T2i, the Tamron SP 70-300 DI VC USD, the Canon EF-S 18-55 mm IS kit lens, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8, and the Canon EF 75-300mm F/4-5.6 III. I also show some Tiefen filters, a plump bob with some fishing line, some memory cards, and a few other gadgets.

In Part 1 of this series, I did a review of the camera bag itself.

In Part 2 of this series, I did a quick review of my audio gear, and showed how everything fits together.

This was filmed with my iPhone 4S for both video and audio.

If you liked this video, click the thumbs up icon. If you’d like to see more reviews like these, hit the subscribe button. If there’s anything in particular you’d like me to do a video about, leave a comment bellow.

Thanks for watching!

Yamaha Clavinova CLP 370 PE demo

The Yamaha Clavinova CLP 370 PE is the piano you can hear me play in some of my videos.  The quality of the sound is quite grandiose, and the feeling and responsiveness of the keys feel quite natural.  In this video from April 17, 2011, I do a quick demonstration of the different voices or sound banks from this piano.

Description from YouTube:

Quick demo of the different voices (sound banks) available on the Clavinova CLP 370. I will show the different voices available, as well as how you can combine them or split the keyboard with different voices.

This was filmed using a Canon EOS T2i and the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 lens, and the Zoom H4n for the audio. I used Adobe Premiere to sync up the audio to the video.

Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD

The Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD quickly became my favourite lens.  This 3-part series shows the unpacking of the lens, an introduction to the lens, and a test of the Vibration Compensation (VC) system.

Description from YouTube:

This is the unboxing of the Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD lens. I discuss my first impressions of its build quality and show what comes in the box.

Video captured with an iPhone 4s, audio captured with a Zoom H4n and SM58 mic.

Description from YouTube:

This is an introduction to the Tamron SP 70-300mm Di f/4-5.6 VC USD lens.  I discuss the features of the lens, and show some pictures at the end with 100% crops.

I already posted a video of a Vibration Control test of this lens, and will post other videos in the future.

If there’s anything in particular you would like to know about this lens, leave a comment bellow, and I’ll try to reply or make a new video out of it.

This was filmed on a T2i with a 50mm f/1.8 lens.  The audio comes from a Zoom H4n with a SM58 microphone.

Sorry for the audio, my memory card was dying on me, and the file sort of got corrupted in a few places.  In one case I had to use the built-in mic of the T2i for a few seconds.

Description from YouTube:

In this test, I show clips at 1080p at 70mm and 300mm with and without VC.

I then use the Canon T2i’s 480p crop mode for an added 7x, giving 70 x 7 x 1.6 = 784mm and 300 x 7 x 1.6 = 3360mm, showing again the difference between VC on and off.

So far I’m very impressed with this lens in general, and the VC is quite remarkable. See for yourself, and leave your comments and questions bellow.

I will be doing more videos reviewing different aspects of this Tamron lens, so subscribe if you want to see the next videos!